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British MP: Do not consult the people of Northern Ireland on their own abortion law

A British MP is seeking assurances from the Government in Westminster that the people of Northern Ireland will have no say in the implementation of a new extreme abortion law in Northern Ireland.

Labour MP Stella Creasy, in a debate on Monday evening about the new extreme abortion law set to be imposed on Northern Ireland, sought a guarantee from the Government that in implementing this abortion legislation, the people of Northern Ireland would not be consulted at all.

She asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland:

“Can [you] confirm whether there is going to be public involvement in that consultation? It is really important for this House to be clear that, just as we would not ask non-medical professionals to consult on how to conduct a vasectomy, we should not do so when it comes to an abortion.”

In July, Stella Creasy put forward the original amendment which sought to introduce abortion into Northern Ireland. The extreme abortion amendment was made known on 4th of July, and it was selected by the Speaker only 37 minutes before the debate began on the 9th of July.

It was subsequently voted through later that afternoon, without the support of a single MP from Northern Ireland who sits in Parliament. As it now stands, the law will permit abortion up until 28 weeks gestation for any reason, including on the grounds of the sex of the child.

Bills can often take months to go through multiple stages in both Houses of Parliament and often have an element of public consultation. The Northern Ireland Bill however, was rushed through most of the parliamentary stages in less than a week.

Abortion remains a devolved issue in Northern Ireland and the Northern Ireland Assembly has consistently rejected abortion. Polling in the region has shown that the majority of women in Northern Ireland (66% in general and 70% of 18-34 year olds) do not want abortion law imposed on Northern Ireland from Westminster.

Furthermore, last weekend, tens of thousands of people attended demonstrations in Belfast against the Government’s extreme abortion legislation.

It is estimated that there are 100,000 people alive today who would otherwise not be, had the Abortion Act 1967 in the rest of Britain, been extended to that region.

Spokesperson for Right To Life UK, Catherine Robinson, said:

“The polling and public demonstrations over the last few days show how little public support there is for this new abortion law. It should come as no surprise that the radically pro-abortion Stella Creasy is extremely keen to ensure that the public are not consulted on this matter. If they were, they would probably reject it.”

“Unfortunately for Ms Creasy however, this is not how democracy works, and it is deeply undemocratic to remove the public from the conversation in this manner. You cannot intentionally keep the people of Northern Ireland out of the discussion simply because you do not like the answer they might give.”

Help stop abortion up to birth for babies with disabilities including Down's syndrome & club foot

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Dear reader

In 2020, the UK Government imposed an extreme abortion regime on Northern Ireland, which included a provision that legalised abortion right up to birth for disabilties including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot.

A new Bill has been launched at the Northern Ireland assembly that will remove the current provision that allows abortion for ‘severe fetal impairment’.

It is under these grounds in the regulations that babies with disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot can currently be singled out for abortion in Northern Ireland because of their disability and can be aborted right up to birth.

Before the new abortion regime was imposed on Northern Ireland in 2020, disability-selective abortion for conditions such as Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot was not legal and there was a culture of welcoming and supporting people with these disabilities rather than eliminating them.

This is reflected directly in the latest figures (2016) from the Department of Health in Northern Ireland, which show that while there were 52 children born with Down’s syndrome in Northern Ireland, in the same year only 1 child from Northern Ireland with Down’s syndrome was aborted in England and Wales. 

This contrasts with the situation in the rest of the United Kingdom where disability-selective abortion has been legal since 1967.

The latest available figures show that 90% of children diagnosed with Down’s syndrome before birth are aborted in England and Wales.

We are, therefore, asking people like you to take 30 seconds of your time and add your support to the campaign to stop abortion up to birth for disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot in Northern Ireland.

If you live in Northern Ireland: 
Ask your MLAs to vote to stop abortion up to birth for disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot:

If you live outside Northern Ireland: 
Show your support by signing this petition in support of the Bill:

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Help stop abortion up to birth for babies with disabilities including Down's syndrome & club foot

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