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Pro-abortion MPs look to remove almost all legal protections surrounding abortion law in England and Wales

Following Parliament’s decision to force abortion on Northern Ireland, pro-abortion MPs have made clear that they want to remove almost all legal protection surrounding the provision of abortion in England and Wales as well.

Last week, (23/07) pro-abortion MP Diana Johnson, put forward an ‘Urgent Question’ to the Home Secretary about the removal almost all legal protections surrounding the provision of abortion in England and Wales.

On behalf of the Government, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Jackie Doyle-Price MP, made assurances that the Government had no plans to change the abortion law in England and Wales. She also said that the Domestic Abuse Bill will not be used as an occasion to debate abortion.

She went on to say: “The question of potential reform to Northern Ireland’s abortion laws, through the Northern Ireland (Executive Formation) Bill if no restored Government are in place, should not be cause to reform the system in England and Wales.

However, this is not much solace to the pro-life movement as the Government did not, at least initially, support any abortion amendments to the recent Northern Ireland Bill. Yet they were nevertheless accepted by the Speaker and rushed through the House of Commons.

Even without Government backing, given the political leanings of the Speaker of the House of Commons, it is likely that amendments put forward by backbench MPs, which would seek to move legal protections surrounding abortion in England and Wales, will in fact be selected. It is expected that these amendments will attempt to remove section 58 and 59 of the Offences Against the Person Act (1861), which will make abortion legal up until 28 weeks.

This will also remove protections surrounding the current abortion law which serve to ensure that women are not being coerced into having an abortion and protect the right of doctors not to be forced to act against their consciences by being made to participate in the provision of abortion.

The abortion lobby have been clear that their ultimate goal here is to have abortion on demand, for any reason, up to birth. If there is any indication that they feel they can get this proposal through Parliament, it’s very likely they will be aiming for abortion up to birth, rather the 28-week cut-off proposed in Northern Ireland.

It is expected that the abortion lobby’s extreme abortion amendments will be tabled in September or October.

Clare McCarthy from Right To Life UK said:

“Given the rapidity with which the Northern Ireland Bill passed through both Houses of Commons with no public scrutiny and almost no Parliamentary scrutiny either, it is possible that something similar could happen with the Domestic Abuse Bill later this year.”

“Ms Johnson’s ‘Urgent Question’ proves that the abortion lobby’s goal goes a lot further than seeking to impose abortion legislation on Northern Ireland. If these proposals were to become law, it would bring about one of the world’s most extreme abortion laws. This Bill would have the effect of making the Abortion Act 1967, along with most of the legal safeguards it provides, void through to at least 28-weeks, i.e over seven months, gestation.

“Their ultimate goal however is to have abortion, for any reason, up to birth. Ann Furedi made this abundantly clear at the London launch of the ‘We Trust Women’ campaign, when she said,  ‘I want to be very, very clear and blunt… there should be no legal upper limit.’ This would mean that legislation would allow for abortion to take place at any moment throughout the entirety of the pregnancy.

Help stop abortion up to birth for babies with disabilities including Down's syndrome & club foot

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Dear reader

In 2020, the UK Government imposed an extreme abortion regime on Northern Ireland, which included a provision that legalised abortion right up to birth for disabilties including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot.

A new Bill has been launched at the Northern Ireland assembly that will remove the current provision that allows abortion for ‘severe fetal impairment’.

It is under these grounds in the regulations that babies with disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot can currently be singled out for abortion in Northern Ireland because of their disability and can be aborted right up to birth.

Before the new abortion regime was imposed on Northern Ireland in 2020, disability-selective abortion for conditions such as Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot was not legal and there was a culture of welcoming and supporting people with these disabilities rather than eliminating them.

This is reflected directly in the latest figures (2016) from the Department of Health in Northern Ireland, which show that while there were 52 children born with Down’s syndrome in Northern Ireland, in the same year only 1 child from Northern Ireland with Down’s syndrome was aborted in England and Wales. 

This contrasts with the situation in the rest of the United Kingdom where disability-selective abortion has been legal since 1967.

The latest available figures show that 90% of children diagnosed with Down’s syndrome before birth are aborted in England and Wales.

We are, therefore, asking people like you to take 30 seconds of your time and add your support to the campaign to stop abortion up to birth for disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot in Northern Ireland.

If you live in Northern Ireland: 
Ask your MLAs to vote to stop abortion up to birth for disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot:

If you live outside Northern Ireland: 
Show your support by signing this petition in support of the Bill:

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Help stop abortion up to birth for babies with disabilities including Down's syndrome & club foot

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