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World Health Organization attempt to push abortion on Ecuador as part of COVID-19 ‘crisis response plan’

The World Health Organization (WHO), the UN group in charge of advising countries on the COVID-19 pandemic, has provided a crisis response plan for Ecaudor that prioritises providing abortion in the country. 

The United Nation’s $46 million plan included just over $10 million allocated for aiding Ecuador’s health systems. 

Of that, $3 million is set aside to support sexual and reproductive health services, calling for the use of the UN’s “Minimum Initial Services Package” (MISP) to fulfill one of the plan’s main objectives, “safe and legal abortion”.

The MISP includes a variety of materials used for abortion, such as vacuumm extractors, tools for dilation and curettage, cranioclasts, and abortificients and is administered by the UNFPA – a historically pro-abortion branch of the United Nations. 

In response to a request from USAID to remove abortion from their coronavirus response plan, Stephane Dujarric, UN spokesman, stated: “Any suggestion that we are using the COVID-19 pandemic as an opportunity to promote abortion is not correct… we do not seek to override any national laws.” 

However, in Ecuador abortion is illegal outside of extreme circumstances. In fact, in 2019 an attempt to legalize abortion in Ecuador on grounds of rape failed. 

According to Elyssa Koren, Director of United Nations Advocacy for ADF International, the WHO’s plans are not only untimely, but “an egregious violation of state sovereignty.” She goes on further to say “The abortion debate falls squarely within the country’s domestic jurisdiction – it is a matter for Ecuadorians to determine for Ecuador.”

Help stop abortion up to birth for babies with disabilities including Down's syndrome & club foot

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Dear reader

In 2020, the UK Government imposed an extreme abortion regime on Northern Ireland, which included a provision that legalised abortion right up to birth for disabilties including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot.

A new Bill has been launched at the Northern Ireland assembly that will remove the current provision that allows abortion for ‘severe fetal impairment’.

It is under these grounds in the regulations that babies with disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot can currently be singled out for abortion in Northern Ireland because of their disability and can be aborted right up to birth.

Before the new abortion regime was imposed on Northern Ireland in 2020, disability-selective abortion for conditions such as Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot was not legal and there was a culture of welcoming and supporting people with these disabilities rather than eliminating them.

This is reflected directly in the latest figures (2016) from the Department of Health in Northern Ireland, which show that while there were 52 children born with Down’s syndrome in Northern Ireland, in the same year only 1 child from Northern Ireland with Down’s syndrome was aborted in England and Wales. 

This contrasts with the situation in the rest of the United Kingdom where disability-selective abortion has been legal since 1967.

The latest available figures show that 90% of children diagnosed with Down’s syndrome before birth are aborted in England and Wales.

We are, therefore, asking people like you to take 30 seconds of your time and add your support to the campaign to stop abortion up to birth for disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot in Northern Ireland.

If you live in Northern Ireland: 
Ask your MLAs to vote to stop abortion up to birth for disabilities including Down’s syndrome, cleft lip and club foot:

If you live outside Northern Ireland: 
Show your support by signing this petition in support of the Bill:

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Help stop abortion up to birth for babies with disabilities including Down's syndrome & club foot

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