New Zealand’s tiniest baby to celebrate first birthday against the odds, after parents reject abortion

A baby girl given just a 30% chance of survival has beaten the odds and will soon celebrate her first birthday after her parents rejected abortion.

Amairah Makan weighed just 490g when she was born by emergency caesarean section at 29 weeks, making her one of New Zealand’s tiniest babies to survive premature birth.

The Auckland tot is now healthy and happy, though nearly half the average weight for her age at just under 5kg, as she approaches her first birthday on 25 February.

Amairah’s mother and father, Kainat and Piyush, were told at the 20-week pregnancy ultrasound scan that their daughter wasn’t growing and that the baby’s prognosis “didn’t look good“.

At that point, doctors told the first-time parents they faced either a delivery at 30 weeks or a stillbirth and offered them an abortion.

Kainat told New Zealand news website Stuff that it was “was the biggest shock” of their lives.

Determined to give their daughter a chance, they declined the abortion.

By 26 weeks, Kainat developed preeclampsia and was hospitalised until Amairah was born weighing just enough to be cared for by the neonatal doctors in Auckland Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). 

Amairah’s rough first year continued and she suffered from a range of medical problems, including chronic lung disease, respiratory distress syndrome, and retinopathy. She also had two surgeries for bowel obstruction and developed multiple infections, needed multiple blood transfusions, ultrasound scans, X-rays and MRI.

Kainat said: “When she was born, I didn’t even see her, I didn’t even hug her, they just took her. We had our first cuddle 12 days after she was born.”

Amairah is now thriving under the care of developmental therapist and dietician.

One month ahead of Amairah’s first birthday her mother exclaimed: “She’s such a happy child, she’s smiling all the time at strangers, she barely cries”.

New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has championed a Government Bill to introduce extreme abortion legislation to New Zealand. The Bill will introduce abortion up to birth for babies with disabilities such as Down’s syndrome or cleft lip and palate.

Currently, there is a 20-week time limit for disability-selective abortions in New Zealand law.

The proposed legislation will see this time limit removed and abortion for babies prenatally diagnosed with Down’s syndrome and other disabilities will be available up until birth, with the approval of a single health practitioner.

A large number of parents have publicly voiced their concerns about the harmful impact this Bill will have on people with Down’s syndrome.

Last month, thousands of people gathered in the New Zealand’s capital city to urge their political leaders to defend human life ahead of an expect vote on the extreme abortion bill later this year.

Baby girl born at 24 weeks with hands the size of a penny thriving at home

A baby girl given just a 5% chance of survival has beaten the odds and is now thriving at home with her parents Kym and Ryan.

With hands smaller than 1p coins, Isabella Evans was the smallest premature baby to be born in the UK, in over 15 years, at her birth on 14 June 2018.

Isabella had to be delivered prematurely by emergency caesarean after complications at 24 weeks, weighing just 12oz (340g), leaving doctors to fear the worst.

For the first week of Isabella was placed in bubble wrap to keep her warm and an incubator to help her breathe. Her parents could only hold their daughter in blankets for five minutes at a time.

And, at just three-weeks-old, the ‘little fighter’ underwent two life-saving operations including surgery for a ruptured bowel.

Isabella refused to give in and fought for six months in order to go home.

She has recovered well and has been enjoying life at home for just over a year, now weighing 13lb 7oz – the size of a healthy baby.

Her mother told the Mail Online: “Realistically, she shouldn’t be here. There were so many times we could have lost her. But she never stopped fighting.”

She added: “She is crawling and starting to stand up, and has a great appetite. Her favourite is a cheese and avocado sandwich. She’s so happy, and has a smile for everyone she meets. It’s incredible how far she’s come.”

Kym and Ryan are grateful for the care and support Isabella received from the NHS and its neonatal team.

Ryan said: ”There are no words for the gratitude I have. They have saved my daughter’s life countless times and I’d be nothing without her.”

Despite the fact that increasing numbers of babies born prematurely in the UK survive, in practice abortion is in most cases up to 24 weeks.

In fact, the survival rate for extremely premature babies has doubled over the past decade, prompting new guidance allowing doctors to try to save babies born as early as 22 weeks into a pregnancy.

The previous clinical guidance, drafted in 2008, included a presumption against attempting to provide life-saving treatment to a baby born before 23 weeks.

On Sunday, two prominent pro-life politicians called for a review of the current time limits after new evidence emerged suggesting that unborn babies at just 13 weeks gestation could be suffering pain as they are being aborted.

A spokesperson for Right to Life UK Catherine Robinson said:

“Parliament should urgently revisit abortion time limits. It has been over a decade since they last debated fully.

“Independent polling from Savanta ComRes shows that 70% of women in the UK want to see the time limit for abortion reduced to 20 weeks or below. Our current abortion time limit is way out of line with the rest of Europe where the most common abortion time limit is 12 weeks.

“It’s time that our laws were brought into line with public opinion, modern science and the rest of Europe.”

Baby girl given 1% chance of survival described as ‘Christmas miracle’ by mother who rejected abortion pressure

The mother of a baby girl given just a 1% chance of survival has described her birth as a “Christmas miracle” after rejecting pressure to have an abortion.

When Kirsty Mizon’s waters broke at just 13 weeks, doctors told her that her baby would pass away within 48 hours and that she should go home and wait for it to happen.

Recalling the event to Derbyshire Live, Kirsty said: “I was devastated. I went home and I waited for the inevitable to happen.

“But it didn’t. My baby’s heartbeat was still going strong.”

As her pregnancy progressed, the doctors persisted in offering her an abortion, telling the 23-year-old that her baby “will be handicapped and won’t be able to use his limbs.”

She said: “They gave her a one per cent survival rate because I was constantly losing amniotic fluid…

“Doctors said with no fluid the baby wouldn’t have any lung capacity or be able to move. It was awful.”

Kirsty began to make funeral arrangements for her unborn baby.

She revealed: “I had been in touch with a bereavement midwife before and I cried so many tears for the baby I thought I was going to lose. I was even put on antidepressants.”

When she finally went into labour at 29 weeks Kirsty was resigned to her unborn baby being a stillborn.

However, against all odds, baby Lacey was born alive at 29 weeks on 1 December weighing a tiny 3lbs.

Kirsty explained when she heard her baby cry, “it was the best feeling ever, the greatest sound I have ever heard.”

She added that baby Lacey is “doing really well” and only has one minor problem which can be fixed with physiotherapy.

It is hoped, Lacey can join her mother, her father, Lewis, and two brothers, Leo and Logan, in the family home in the new year.

She added: “I am still in shock. I just can’t believe I have a baby. A beautiful baby girl.

“She is my Christmas miracle.”

Mother who rejected abortion looking forward to Christmas with her son

A mother and her son are looking forward to another Christmas together almost three years after doctors told her that she should have an abortion.

Sharee McCoy and her son Luka began beating the odds just eight weeks into her pregnancy, when a rare complication was discovered which can be threatening to both the mother and the baby in the womb.

Doctors at SSM Health St Mary’s Hospital told Sharee continuing with her pregnancy could result in a life-threatening rupture or severe bleeding, and directed her to have an abortion.

Just a year earlier, Sharee had lost her first child – a son named Jude – to a congenital heart disease when he was just two months old. Determined to do everything she could to save her baby, she asked if there was any way to continue her pregnancy.

After a few hours of waiting and doctors deliberating she was offered a pioneering first-of-its-kind surgery, but with no guarantee, it would work.

Dr Cristian Campian, the SLU Care Urogynecologist at SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital, told a video documenting Sharee and Luka’s experience that the procedure had never been done before, so he had no blueprint to go with ahead of Sharee’s surgery. He told Sharee there was a 99 percent chance the surgery wouldn’t work.

However, the surgery was a success, and McCoy suffered no further complications until Luka’s premature birth at 31 weeks in March 2017.

During the birth, Sharee suffered massive blood loss and had to be rushed to the hospital’s intensive care unit where she had to have her uterus surgically removed.

Doctors feared Sharee might not make it and decided it was time for Sharee and her son, who was dealing with health issues of his own, to meet one another.

Luka, who was having trouble breathing on his own in the NICU, was able to be weaned off oxygen and then began breathing without assistance for the first time while he was on his mother’s chest.

Chaela Kinney, Luka’s NICU nurse, said: “I didn’t heal Luka, his mom healed Luka, and I think Luka helped to heal Sharee… Being able to witness that, it’s a miracle.”

Two years later, neither Sharee or Luka seem to have suffered any complications from their time in the hospital.

Sharee said “Luka will be three in March and he’s doing great. I just hope this will be inspiring and give people hope”.