Marie Stopes franchise forced to close after ‘fake’ doctors found performing illegal abortions

The bodies of ten illegally aborted babies have been found discarded and decomposing in a bin at a Marie Stopes International franchise ‘Medical Centre’ in Kenya, it has been revealed.

A police search of the Marie Stopes franchise Prestige Health Point Medical Centre in Nairobi’s Pangani estate last week, also uncovered medical equipment and drugs commonly used in abortion procedures.

As a result of the findings, Kenya’s national police service, the Directorate of Criminal Investigations, revealed they had arrested two ‘fake doctors’ and three other workers on suspicion of conducting illegal terminations. 

The Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Council has disclosed the two arrested ‘doctors’ were not registered medical practitioners. “The men had not produced any documents to prove that they were doctors,” said Deputy William Sirego. “They have no registration numbers”.

The medical body has now ordered the closure of Prestige Health Point Medical Centre and suspended its registration certificate and operating license with immediate effect, pending investigation.

Citing evidence that providing abortions may have been the alleged medical centre’s main function, an individual living locally to the facility told All Africa that “most of [the patients]are young girls”.

The medical centre was one of more than 400 Amua  Marie Stopes franchise clinics across Kenya, before its closure.

Exceptional quality?

The Marie Stopes Kenya website states: “At our Amua clinics we guarantee you an excellent healthcare experience at a very affordable price.”

It adds: “But what truly sets us apart is our strong belief in offering services of exceptional quality that meet the global Marie Stopes International standards. Our network of 400 clinics is also spread all over Kenya thus bringing our services closer to you.”

While Marie Stopes International claims to offer “exceptional quality” and “excellent healthcare”, the reality appears to be the opposite.

Just last week it was revealed a nurse in the UK was left fearing for her life and needing emergency surgery after Marie Stopes denied the woman counselling and forced her to take abortion pills at home, rather than under the supervision of a doctor in a clinic.

A damning report from the UK’s Care Quality Commission (CQC) accused Marie Stopes International of paying staff bonuses for coercing women into abortions.

In addition, the CQC found the abortion group was not following proper sterilization and infection control protocols and was improperly disposing of the bodies of the babies they aborted.

In 2016, Marie Stopes International was forced to suspend abortion services for a month after an unannounced inspection by the CQC found dead foetuses lying in an open bin and staff trying to give a vulnerable, visibly distressed woman an abortion without her consent”.

In 2012, a woman called Aisha Chithira, 32, bled to death after having an abortion in Ealing Marie Stopes. A Marie Stopes doctor and two nurses were charged and then acquitted of gross negligence manslaughter.

Increased funding for abortion giant

Despite these offences, the UK increased funding for Marie Stopes International by 5000% from 2006 to 2018.

The Department for International Development has increased its contributions to the abortion giant from £905,000 in 2006 to £48,173,000 in 2018.

As pointed out by Kenya’s Directorate of Criminal Investigations, Kenya’s constitution guarantees the right to life and states that life begins at conception – something the majority of the country’s population still believe.

A recent survey conducted by Ipsos MORI, which questioned 2,050 people across the country, showed 86% of women and 84% of men believe “abortion should never be permitted”.

International abortion organisations trying to change law

Regardless of the social attitudes in the country, major international and well-financed organisations, including Ipas, MSI and Planned Parenthood Global, are attempting to push more extreme abortion legislation on Kenya and other African countries.  

The latest attempt to introduce a radical abortion Bill has been halted following pressure from the Kenyan population and pro-life campaigners.

 ‘Kenya’s constitution is clear’

A spokesperson for Right To Life UK, Catherine Robinson said: “The Kenyan constitution is clear that life begins in the womb and should be protected under the bill of rights.

“A full investigation must be conducted into Marie Stopes International’s actions not just in Kenya, but around the world where they are likely offering abortions illegally and without due care for the women they claim to give ‘excellent healthcare’ too.

“Funding for Marie Stopes International from the UK Government should be removed from the organisation and given to organisations offering pregnant women real support.”

Proposal to introduce abortion up to birth to Malawi faces cross-community opposition

An extreme abortion Bill, which would allow abortion on demand right up to the point of birth, in Malawi faces opposition from a cross-community group of religious leaders in the country.

In a joint statement issued last month, the leaders of Malawi’s three main Christian groups and the Muslim Association of Malawi have come together to urge lawmakers to reject the “inhumane and wicked” proposals.

“The current law protects both the child and mother,” whereas “the proposed amendment does not protect the life of the unborn child,” their statement adds.

Chairperson of the Parliamentary Committee on Health, Matthews Ngwale, is expected to table his extreme abortion legislation during the National Assembly’s current sitting, which ends on 23 October.

Abortion for any reason, on-demand, up to birth

The Termination of Pregnancy Bill outlines that abortion would be available without a time limit on grounds that “the termination of pregnancy is necessary to prevent injury to the physical or mental health of a pregnant woman”.

While this language appears to provide abortion on only narrow grounds, in practice it will likely allow for abortion on demand to be available up to birth in Malawi through a broad interpretation of the term “health”.

Malawi’s Christian Medical and Dental Fellowship expressed ‘grave concern’ after a similarly worded bill was introduced in 2016, stating it “has led other countries to effectively practice abortion on demand”.

The group noted that 98% of the UK’s abortions take place under equally permissive language.

However, unlike the UK’s 24-week limit, Malawi’s Termination of Pregnancy Bill has no time limit attached to the clause allowing abortion on mental health grounds and would effectively allow abortion on-demand, up-to-birth. 

The proposals will also allow children to procure an abortion without parental consent and could result in doctors who don’t want to be involved in abortion procedure, or provide a referral, receiving five-year prison sentences.

International pressure

The religious bodies say the Bill is a result of increased pressure from Non-Governmental Organisations to introduce an extreme abortion law.

International organisation Ipas is just one of the organisations hoping to push abortion on Malawi and across Africa.

The well-financed organisation, which has been active in Malawi since 2005, received $87,302,217 over 12 months, according to its most recent financial report, and claims to spend 42% of its income in Africa.

How international organisations are pushing for abortion law change

The international abortion group and other organisations are attempting to use a legislation change model which, in practice, introduces abortion-on-demand, for any reason, right up to birth.

This model firstly involves international organisations lobbying Governments to introduce new legislation, as they are currently doing in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, and likely other countries across Africa. They then place themselves as key advisers on the roll-out of the new abortion service, including advising on associated standards and protocols across the country. 

In this position as a key adviser, the organisation produces comprehensive guidance for the respective Government and healthcare providers. This guidance outlines how they can interpret language in the new legislation to allow for abortion on demand.

For example, this model can be seen in operation in Ghana, where the legislation relating to abortion includes what appears to be restrictive grounds for abortion “where the continuance of the pregnancy would involve risk to the life of the pregnant woman or injury to her physical or mental health”.

While the language sounds restrictive, Ipas assisted guidance instructs healthcare professionals to take a very broad interpretation of the wording. This has, in practice, allowed abortion to take place on-demand and for any reason.

The involvement of Ipas in writing Ghana’s abortion guidance has not been hidden or obscured. A foreword to the current guidance states: “This document has been put together by a team of national experts with technical assistance from Ipas and WHO, Geneva.”

Indoctrination

In addition to lobbying parliamentarians, Ipas are now attempting to indoctrinate young people through workshops and education programmes via the Ipas-established Coalition for Prevention of Unsafe Abortion (COPUA).

Netherlands-based development aid organization, Hivos, which helps fund COPUA through its Regional SRHR Fund, revealed that they have “amplified” the voice of young people pushing for abortion legislation.

In a news update on their website, the NGO, which works across Africa, Latin America and Asia, further disclosed that having ‘educated’ young people in Malawi, Ipas have now “created platforms at community, districts and national levels for the youth to engage in the policy discourse on the Termination of Pregnancy Bill.”

Crushing defeat expected

Despite all of the activism, lobbying and pressure from international abortion organisations, the extreme abortion proposals face a crushing defeat if they are brought forward to Malawi’s National Assembly.

A survey of 141 of Malawi’s 188 MPs, conducted by national newspaper The Nation, found that 80% of lawmakers surveyed (113) will reject The Termination of Pregnancy Bill because “it is legalising killing”.

18% of MPs (26) said they were undecided and needed to consult their local constituents before making a decision. Just one male and one female MP revealed they would approve the extreme Bill.

The religious bodies indicate the proposals may not even reach that point, revealing that the previous abortion Bill was discontinued on 6 December 2016 following nationwide protests in all districts Malawi.

Call to respect all human life

The religious bodies fighting the Bill have called on all Malawians to join them in standing up for the life of all people, including the unborn.

They declare that “human life, irrespective of any religious focus, has a value in itself and for itself and is the foundation on which any other human value can develop.”

“The right to life remains complete in an old person, even one greatly weakened; it is not lost by one who is incurably sick. The right to life is no less to be respected in the small infant just born than in the mature person. In reality, respect for human life is called for from the time that the process of generation begins,” they add.

Radical abortion legislation not wanted in Malawi

While there has not been any research on the public opinion around abortion in Malawi, local campaigners revealed to Right To Life UK that the vast majority of Malawian citizens are pro-life.

This mirrors a 2020 Ipsos Synovate poll from Kenya, where there is also currently international pressure to change abortion legislation, which showed just 6% of people think abortion should be permitted.

Therefore, the extreme changes being pushed on abortion legislation in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, and other African countries, by international organisations are likely not to be in line with the views of individuals living in the country. 

However, it is highly probable Ipas and other abortion proponents will continue pushing for a change in law undeterred. 

‘Ideological colonialism’

Pro-life campaigner, Ella Duru told Right To Life UK: “This is a brazen attempt by Western abortion organisations to impose abortion, for any reason, up to birth on Malawi.

“Women in Malawi don’t need abortion to be empowered. Instead, lawmakers should look at proposals which support women such as improved healthcare, good schools and additional skills training.

“To have these well-funded overseas organisations spending lots of money to try and force more extreme abortion laws on Malawi and other African countries, particularly when it is unwanted, is a form of ideological colonialism.

“Cash rich donors from the West continue to exploit their privilege and position to offer abortion which is contrary to the pro-life values held by a large majority of African people.

“Given that these proposals would likely deny unborn babies the right to life right up to the point of birth, these proposals must be defeated by lawmakers if they reach the National Assembly.”

‘Sad sign of the times’

Rev. Dr Zacc Kawalala Chairperson of Ethics, Peace and Justice Commission (EPJC) of Evangelical Association of Malawi told Right To Life UK: “The Bill being put forward, with the help of international abortion organisations would deny unborn babies the right to life. This is the most important right of all so the Bill must be defeated.

“It is a sad sign of the times that ‘development’ now consists of pushing abortion laws on countries that want to protect life at its most vulnerable stage.

“Women don’t need abortion to be empowered. Instead, lawmakers should look at proposals which do support and empower the people of Malawi such as improved healthcare, good schools and additional skills training.”

Majority of Malawi MPs reveal intention to defeat extreme abortion Bill

An extreme abortion Bill, which would allow abortion on demand right up to the point of birth, faces a crushing defeat if it is brought forward to Malawi’s National Assembly.

A survey of 141 of Malawi’s 188 MPs, conducted by national newspaper The Nation, found that 80% of lawmakers surveyed (113) will reject The Termination of Pregnancy Bill because “it is legalising killing”.

18% of MPs (26) said they were undecided and needed to consult their local constituents before making a decision. 

Just one male and one female MP revealed they would approve the extreme Bill, which is being pushed by a coalition of international abortion organisations – including Ipas.

Chairperson of the Parliamentary Committee on Health, Matthews Ngwale, is still expected to introduce the proposed legislation during the Assembly’s current sitting which ends on 23 October.

Despite strong opposition from MPs, he claims “ignorance is fuelling rejection of the Bill”.

‘Life is sacred’

Mwanza West MP Joyce Chitsulo revealed how, far from ignorance, a decision not to abort her baby daughter – who is now a midwife – has helped form her pro-life views. 

She reportedly told The Nation: “I did not abort. I just could not and I am proud of my choice. Of the three children I have, the first is my daughter, born out of that pregnancy. Today, I find my decision even more fulfilling that she is an accomplished midwife herself.” 

She added: “So long as the Bill is to do with abortion, it is a straight ‘No’ vote from me.” 

Rumphi East legislator Kamlepo Kaluwa said he couldn’t support the Bill as it “authorises killing”.  

Susan Dossi, the MP for Chikawawa West, agrees, stating that “life is sacred”. 

Abortion for any reason, on-demand, up to birth

The Termination of Pregnancy Bill outlines that abortion would be available without a time limit on grounds that “the termination of pregnancy is necessary to prevent injury to the physical or mental health of a pregnant woman”.

While this language appears to provide abortion on only narrow grounds, in practice it will likely allow for abortion on demand to be available up to birth in Malawi through a broad interpretation of the term “health”.

Malawi’s Christian Medical and Dental Fellowship expressed ‘grave concern’ after a similarly worded bill was introduced in 2016, stating it “has led other countries to effectively practice abortion on demand”.

The group noted that 98% of the UK’s abortions take place under equally permissive language. However, unlike the UK’s 24-week limit, Malawi’s Termination of Pregnancy Bill has no time limit attached to the clause allowing abortion on mental health grounds and would effectively allow abortion, on-demand, up-to-birth. 

Abortion can be performed on children and teens

The proposed legislation does not include an age limit for abortions meaning that abortions can be performed on children and teenagers. 

No parental consent required

The proposals also include a clause which allows a health service provider to provide an abortion without their parent’s consent if they feel that “that termination of pregnancy is in the best interests of the child.”

The legislation does not mention the introduction of any specific legal safeguards to prevent third-parties from taking children for abortions. This could open up the possibility of an adult who has sexually abused a child to take them for an abortion, to help cover-up their actions.

Five-year-jail sentence for doctors who conscientiously object

The change in law would also introduce a five-year jail sentence for any health professional that conscientiously objects to being involved with providing an abortion and does not want to be complicit in the abortion process by providing a referral onto another health professional who will provide an abortion.

No requirement that a doctor must be involved with abortions prior to 12-weeks

Under the proposed law, abortions can be performed by medical assistants, midwifery technicians, registered nurses, midwives and clinical officers, without a trained doctor present, in case of a complication. 

In England and Wales, abortions can only be performed by a registered medical practitioner (doctor), and the Abortion Act requires the approval of two doctors before an abortion can be performed. 

Even with this legal restriction in place, there are still many cases of complications during abortions in the UK, resulting in babies being born alive, women’s uteruses being perforated or severe haemorrhaging that has resulted in death

Under the proposed law in Malawi, prior to 12-weeks gestation, there is no requirement that a doctor perform and no requirement for the approval of two doctors before an abortion can be performed.

Babies born alive after abortion to be left to die

In the new legislation, there is no mention of a legal requirement that babies born alive after an abortion are resuscitated or provided with medical assistance.

This is more common than many people think. In 2008, a UK report found that 66 infants were born alive after NHS terminations in one year. The majority of those 66 babies took over an hour to die. 

In Victoria, Australia, where there is a similarly extreme abortion law to that proposed in Malawi, scores of babies were left to die after being removed alive during a number of ‘botched’ terminations, according to one official review

The review reported that in 2011 there were 40 ‘terminations of pregnancy’ after 20 weeks ‘resulting in live birth’. While these figures are comparable in scale, Victoria’s population of 5.5 million is just a tenth of Britain’s.

This shows the scale of this problem in an environment where there are very few legal safeguards around abortion.

Legalised partial-birth abortions

In the proposed framework there is no mention of a legal restriction on the types of abortion methods used to abort babies.

This could allow for the use of particularly gruesome abortion methods such intact dilation and extraction abortions (also knows as partial-birth abortions) and other controversial methods of abortion.

A ‘partial-birth’ abortion involves the feticidal injection of digoxin or potassium chloride at the beginning of the procedure to allow for softening of the fetal bones before the fetus is removed in a breech position. If the baby’s skull is too large to fit through the birth canal, it is crushed to allow the skull to be removed. Decompression of the skull can be accomplished by incision and suction of the contents, or by using forceps.

How international organisations are pushing for abortion law change

International NGOs, such as Ipas, have used a legislation change model in a number of other countries where they have lobbied for a law change, which, in practice, introduces abortion on demand, for any reason. 

This model firstly involves international organisations lobbying Governments to introduce new legislation, as they are currently doing in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, and likely other countries across Africa. They then place themselves as key advisers on the roll-out of the new abortion service, including advising on associated standards and protocols across the country. 

In this position, as a key adviser, they have then been involved with producing comprehensive guidance for governments and healthcare providers, which outlines how they can interpret language in the new legislation to allow for abortion on demand.

For example, this model can be seen in operation in Ghana where the legislation relating to abortion includes what appears to be restrictive grounds for abortion “where the continuance of the pregnancy would involve risk to the life of the pregnant woman or injury to her physical or mental health”.

However, Ipas assisted guidance specifically instructs healthcare professionals to take a very broad interpretation of what appears to be similar restrictive wording. This has, in practice, allowed abortion to take place on-demand and for any reason. 

The involvement of Ipas in writing Ghana’s abortion guidance has not been hidden or obscured. 

A foreword to the current guidance states: “This document has been put together by a team of national experts with technical assistance from Ipas and WHO, Geneva.”

In Malawi, without a time limit in the proposed legislation, a similarly broad interpretation would allow abortion for any reason, on-demand, up to birth. 

Radical abortion legislation not wanted in Malawi

While there has not been any research on the public opinion around abortion in Malawi, local campaigners revealed to Right To Life UK that the vast majority of Malawian citizens are pro-life.

This mirrors a 2020 Ipsos Synovate poll from Kenya, where there is also currently international pressure to change abortion legislation, which showed just 6% of people think abortion should be permitted.

Therefore, the extreme changes being pushed on abortion legislation in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, and other African countries, by international organisations are likely not to be in line with the views of individuals living in the country. 

However, it is highly probable Ipas and other abortion proponents will continue pushing for a change in law undeterred. 

President likely to oppose Bill

Pro-life campaigners in the country expect the current President, Lazarus Chakwera, to come out in opposition to the Bill.

His son, Nic, has recently written an opinion piece against the Bill stating all humans have a right to life. 

Campaigners are also calling on the Malawi Special Law Commission to condemn the Bill given how extreme the proposed legislation is. 

‘Ideological colonialism’

Pro-life campaigner, Ella Duru told Right To Life UK: “This is a brazen attempt by Western abortion organisations to impose abortion, for any reason, up to birth on Malawi.

“Women in Malawi don’t need abortion to be empowered. Instead, lawmakers should look at proposals which support women such as improved healthcare, good schools and additional skills training.

“To have these well-funded overseas organisations spending lots of money to try and force more extreme abortion laws on Malawi and other African countries, particularly when it is unwanted, is a form of ideological colonialism.

“Cash rich donors from the West continue to exploit their privilege and position to offer abortion which is contrary to the pro-life values held by a large majority of African people.

“Given that these proposals would likely deny unborn babies the right to life right up to the point of birth, these proposals must be defeated by lawmakers if they reach the National Assembly.”

‘Sad sign of the times’

Rev. Dr Zacc Kawalala Chairperson of Ethics, Peace and Justice Commission (EPJC) of Evangelical Association of Malawi told Right To Life UK: “The Bill being put forward, with the help of international abortion organisations would deny unborn babies the right to life. This is the most important right of all so the Bill must be defeated.

“It is a sad sign of the times that ‘development’ now consists of pushing abortion laws on countries that want to protect life at its most vulnerable stage.

“Women don’t need abortion to be empowered. Instead, lawmakers should look at proposals which do support and empower the people of Malawi such as improved healthcare, good schools and additional skills training.”

85% of Kenyans are pro-life, new survey reveals as abortion is pushed on country by international organisations

Eighty-five percent  of people in Kenya believe “abortion should never be permitted”, a new survey conducted by Ipsos MORI has revealed.

The poll, which questioned 2,050 people across the country, also showed a higher percentage of women than men believe abortion should never be permitted, with 86% of women and 84% of men taking that position.

The survey also shows that Muslim respondents and respondents that identify as non-religious were two the groups where people were most likely to be pro-life, with 91% of Muslim respondents stating they believed abortion should never be permitted and 86% of non-religious respondents. 

It comes as major international and well-financed organisations, including Ipas and Planned Parenthood Global, attempt to push more extreme abortion legislation on Kenya and other African countries.  

Abortion for any reason, on-demand, up to birth

The Termination of Pregnancy section of Kenya’s Reproductive Healthcare Bill outlines that abortion would be available without a time limit on grounds that “the pregnancy would endanger the life or health of the mother”.

While this language appears to provide abortion on only narrow grounds, in practice it will likely allow for abortion on demand to be available up to birth in Kenya through a broad interpretation of the term “health”.

Three-year-jail sentence for doctors who conscientiously object

The proposed legislation also introduces a three-year jail sentence for any health professional that conscientiously objects to being involved with providing an abortion and does not want to be complicit in the abortion process by providing a referral onto another health professional who will provide an abortion.

In a country where polling shows large majorities oppose abortion, this provision forcing doctors to be complicit in the abortion process could have a very wide negative impact, forcing many health professionals to act against their conscience, or, for a likely large group of health professionals who do not wish to be complicit in the abortion process, this would mean they face jail time.

Large cost to Kenyan Government

The Bill would also come at a large cost to the Kenyan Government, as it specifically requires the outlay of national services providing ‘reproductive health care’ including abortion.

In addition to the financial cost, the Bill would place health services in Kenya, which are already operating under limited resources due to the coronavirus pandemic, under even more pressure at a time when they should be focused on saving lives.

In response to this pressure, and a call for more ventilators, both the UK and Swedish Government’s dedicated more funding for abortion in Kenya and other African countries.

How international organisations are pushing abortion on Africa

International NGOs, such as Ipas, have used a legislation change model in a number of other countries where they have lobbied for a law change, which, in practice, introduces abortion on demand, for any reason. 

This model involves firstly lobbying Governments to introduce new legislation, as they are currently doing in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, and likely other countries across Africa. 

They then place themselves as key advisers on the roll-out of the new abortion service, including advising on associated standards and protocols across the country. 

In this position, as a key adviser, they have then been involved with producing comprehensive guidance for governments and healthcare providers, which outlines how they can interpret language in the new legislation to allow for abortion on demand.

For example, this model can be seen in operation in Ghana where the legislation relating to abortion includes what appears to be restrictive grounds for abortion “where the continuance of the pregnancy would involve risk to the life of the pregnant woman or injury to her physical or mental health”.

However, Ipas assisted guidance specifically instructs healthcare professionals to take a very broad interpretation of what appears to be similarly restrictive wording. This has, in practice, allowed abortion to take place on-demand and for any reason 

The involvement of Ipas in writing abortion guidance for Ghana has not been hidden or obscured. Nor has the fact that they are working with other international groups in attempting to push extreme abortion legislation on Malawi and Namibia.

The well-financed organisation received $87,302,217 over 12 months according to its most recent financial report and claims to spend 42% of its income in Africa.

On hold

The radical abortion bill in Kenya has now been put on hold following pressure from pro-life advocates.

Kenyan-born Ann Kioko, who launched a petition against the proposed legislation, told the Shepherd last month that the Committee handling the bill had called her to say they were temporarily stopping debate on the Bill until “all the contentious issues were resolved through public participation.”

Ms Kioko said: “It is a half victory for pro-lifers… Now we need a united approach to present one common stand. What we are waiting for is the letter detailing the way forward.”

She added that the Senate had proved it had the interests of the nation at heart by suspending the bill.

However, citing a source in the Senate, she warned that proponents of the bill were lobbying for the legislators to reject any amendments to it.

“It is a continuous war. They may have a war chest to buy politicians but if we are united, we shall overcome,” she said.

Charles Kanjama, a lawyer and the chairman of Kenya Christian Professionals Forum, estimates it’ll be at least three months before the Bill can come back to the Senate for a Third Reading.  

If it progresses past a Third Reading, the 349 MPs which make up Kenya’s lower house will debate and vote on the Bill’s fate. 

‘Ideological colonialism’

Pro-life campaigner, Ella Duru told Right To Life UK: “This is a brazen attempt by Western abortion organisations to impose abortion, for any reason, up to birth on Kenya.

“To have these well-funded, overseas organisations spending lots of money to try and force abortion on Kenya when 87% believe it is morally unacceptable is a form of ideological colonialism.

“Cash-rich donors from the West continue to exploit their privilege and position to offer abortion and family planning ‘services’ which are contrary to the pro-life values held by a large majority of African people.

“The Kenyan constitution, in Article 26, makes it clear that life begins at conception and should be protected under the bill of rights. 

“Given that this Bill would deny unborn babies the right to life right up to the point of birth, this appalling Bill must be defeated by MPs in the National Assembly. 

“If you are Kenyan please contact your local representative and detail that, rather than bring clarity to the constitution, this extreme Bill will introduce an extreme abortion law that is not in the best interests of Kenyans and the unborn.”

Kenyan-born Ann Kioko, who has launched a petition against the Bill, has previously spoken out on how abortion is pushed on countries in the developing world.

Last year, the campaigner told delegates at the UN’s Protecting Femininity and Human Dignity in Women’s Empowerment event:

“Contrary to what the negotiators of some countries argue here or… push on countries in the developing world, a young girl in a village like mine…does not need policies that prioritize abortion. … It is time we brought the women in the grassroots to the table. They will tell you they don’t need abortion … to be empowered…

“(Women) need fully equipped health centers, they need good schools, they need clothing, they need food on their tables! They need electricity. And they need to be imparted with proper skills so they can be good career women. … I keep looking forward to that day the UN and those who are speaking and working for the women of the world will get the priorities of the women at the grassroots correct.”