Mother beaten and tortured by her boyfriend in attempted forced abortion

Three people forced laundry detergent into a pregnant teenager’s mouth as they tried to make her have a miscarriage, a court has heard. The teenager’s boyfriend, Harief Pearson, 22, orchestrated the attack “because he did not want to be a father”.

Prior to his attempt to end the life his unborn child, Pearson had searched “how to get rid of an unwanted pregnancy” and “what can heroin do to an unborn baby” on his phone.

As his two accomplices punched, stamped and kicked the girl on her stomach, back and chest, then ripped off one of her nails and poured alcohol over her face. He told the pregnant victim “it didn’t have to be like this.”

Fortunately, despite this torture, both the mother and her child survived the attack.

Right To Life UK has previously raised concerns about forced abortions in relation to abortion pills being made available to take at home, because it could make them far more difficult to detect.

Clare McCarthy of Right To Life UK said:

[Making the second abortion pill available to take at home] poses a threat to vulnerable girls who are at risk from sex-trafficking or child-sex abuse, as the ‘home’ abortion could be used by their abusers as a means to more easily cover up trafficking or abuse scandals.

In 2018, the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock, made it possible to take the 2nd pill used in a medical abortion (misoprostol) at home. In this case, it was the especially violent nature of  Pearson’s attack his girlfriend that made his crime so clear.

However, the use of the abortion pill at home without any supervision, could make forced abortions far more difficult to detect.

(Photo credit: CPS)

Social media platform, Pinterest, accused of censoring pro-life group

The image sharing social media platform, Pinterest, has banned the pro-life group Live Action, from its website for spreading supposedly “harmful misinformation”.

Live Action originally found had their content blocked as it was listed as pornography. After they appealed this verdict, Live Action had the Pinterest account permanently suspended.

In a follow-up email, a representative of Pinterest said that the problem was “misinformation related to conspiracies and anti-vaccination advice, and not porn.”

Others have pointed out however that Live Action has no view on vaccines and the only thing they have reported on in that respect is the issue of using aborted foetal cells to create vaccines.

The Pinterest whistleblower employee who first drew attention to the alleged censorship of Live Action, Eric Cochran, was sacked shortly afterwards.

This is not the first instance of pro-life groups being concerned about social media censorship. Live Action itself boasts 3 million followers across their social media accounts (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and formerly, Pinterest) and it remains one of the methods by which pro-life groups spread their message to supporters and people who might not otherwise see it.

The whistleblower suggested that big tech companies, like Pinterest, do not want the pro-life message to be allowed on their platforms. The pro-life position however, is not the view of a radical minority in the US or in Britain.

In Britain 70% of women want to see the legal for abortion to be lowered from 24 weeks to 20 weeks or less and 91% of women want an explicit ban on sex-selective abortion.

So far pro-life groups in Britain, such as Right to Life UK, have not had their Pinterest accounts shut down.

(Photo credit – Youtube:screenshot)